Impact of Local Breast Cancer Recurrence on Reconstructed Breast in Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy with Immediate Reconstruction

Zhen-Yu Wu, Hyun Ho Han, Jing Han, et al.
Impact of Local Breast Cancer Recurrence on Reconstructed Breast in Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy with Immediate Reconstruction

The impact of locally recurrent breast cancer on reconstructed breasts remains largely unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the incidence of reconstruction loss due to local recurrence in patients who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate reconstruction for breast cancer and to identify potential recurrence-associated risk factors for loss of index reconstruction. The records of 1,696 patients who underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate reconstruction between March 2003 and December 2016 at a single institution were reviewed. Among them, 128 patients with local breast cancer recurrence as the first event were analyzed. The primary outcome was loss of reconstruction due to local breast cancer recurrence. Reconstruction loss was classified as partial flap loss with breast distortion, complete flap loss, or implant loss during salvage treatment of local recurrence. Reconstruction loss occurred in 21 of the 128 patients (16%). Reconstruction loss rates were 20% for autologous and 9.5% for implant-based reconstruction (P = 0.204). Multivariate analysis showed that recurrent tumor size > 2.0 cm and multifocal recurrence were independent factors associated with an increased risk of reconstruction loss. Moreover, age ≥ 50 years at the time of recurrence diagnosis, recurrent tumor size > 2.0 cm, and multifocal recurrence were independently associated with complete flap/implant loss in the multivariate analysis. The incidence of reconstruction loss due to local breast cancer recurrence after nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate reconstruction was low in this study. Age ≥ 50 years at recurrence diagnosis and the extent of local recurrence independently affected reconstruction loss. To detect recurrence early, careful follow-up through regular ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging at the reconstruction site is important.

Read full article here: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35487872/