Retrospective review of 108 breast reconstructions using the round block technique after breast-conserving surgery: Indications, complications, and outcomes

Seok Kyung In, Yoon Soo Kim, Ho Sung Kim, Jin Hyung Park, Hong Il Kim, Hyung Suk Yi, Jea Chun Park, Chang Wan Jeon, Jin Hyuk Choi, Sung Ui Jung, and Hyo Young Kim

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Several oncoplastic approaches have been implemented in recent years to enhance cosmetic results and to reduce complications. The round block technique is a volume displacement technique for breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). However, its indications are currently limited according to tumor location, and its cosmetic results and complications have not been clearly established. We hypothesized that the round block technique could produce favorable cosmetic results without major complications regardless of tumor location or nipple-tumor distance, below a certain resected tumor volume and tumor-breast volume ratio.

All breast reconstructions using the round block technique after BCS were included in this analysis. Patients’ data were reviewed retrospectively to investigate complications during follow-up, and clinical photos were used to evaluate cosmetic results. The relationships of tumor location, nipple-tumor distance, tumor volume, and the tumor-breast volume ratio with cosmetic results were investigated.

In total, 108 breasts were reconstructed. The mean resected tumor volume was 30.2±15.0 mL. The cosmetic score was 4.5±0.6 out of 5. Tumor location, nipple-tumor distance, tumor volume, tumor-breast volume ratio, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy had no significant effects on cosmetic results or complications. There were no major complications requiring reoperation.

Breast reconstruction using the round block technique after BCS can lead to good cosmetic results without major complications regardless of the tumor location, nipple-tumor distance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. Below the maximum tumor volume (79.2 mL) and the maximum tumor-breast volume ratio (14%), favorable results were consistently obtained.

Read the full article here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7700858/ 

Jasmine Walter

Content Editor, Mark Allen Group

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