Three-Year Intermediate Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study Investigating the use of Smooth, Semi-Smooth, Microtextured and Macrotextured Implants from a Single Manufacturer in Breast Augmentation and Reconstruction Procedures

Alexandre Marchac, Robert El Haddad, Corinne Boedec, Christian DE Greef, Fabrice Dubrulle, Jaime Garcia Perez et al.

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Silicone gel-filled implants exist in a wide range of shapes and textures, and yet there are relatively few long-term large-scale studies, particularly on recently developed "semi-smooth" implants. The present study fills this gap by presenting the 3-year findings from an ongoing 10-year multicenter prospective study on breast implants with four different surface types: smooth, semi-smooth, microtextured, and macrotextured. A total of 908 patients were recruited in 15 investigational sites across Europe and divided into three groups: 653 primary augmentations in Group 1, 144 revision augmentations in Group 2, and 111 reconstructions in Group 3. All 4 types of implant shells were manufactured by the same company using the same silicone material. Surgeons were free to choose their preferred technique and implant surface, but data were collected using a standardized software and included all complications, and satisfaction levels reported by the patients at each visit. The incidence of post-operative complications was estimated based on Kaplan-Meier risk rates, on a per patient basis. At 3 years post implantation, capsular contracture (Baker grade III/IV) was the most common complication, with a per-patient risk rate of 1.5% in Group 1. Interestingly, there was no capsular contracture in this group when semi-smooth implants were used. The risk of implant rupture in Group 1 was 0.2%. The preliminary findings of this 10-year prospective study indicate that, 3 years after the operation, the four types of silicone gel-filled implants investigated were safe, with a low complication rate in comparison with the most favorable results published in other similar studies.

Read more here: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34088647/ 

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